The stunning extent to which Trumpism is centered among Fox News-watching Republicans

…there is a powerful Fox News Party operating within the Republican Party,” PRRI’s CEO Robert Jones told The Post in an email. “Fully 40 percent of Republicans say they most trust Fox News to provide accurate information about current events and politics, and this group looks different from other Republicans on nearly every issue.”

“They are President Trump’s foot soldiers within the party,” he added. ” … So when the president talks directly to Fox News, it essentially functions as a command and control center linking him to his most stalwart supporters.”

Washington Post

Related:

Watching Fox News makes you more stupid

Time’s up: After a reprieve, a wave of evictions expected across U.S.

On Sept. 1, U.S. health officials announced they would suspend evictions across the United States to help stem further spread of the novel coronavirus.

That was three days too late for Latrise Bean.

About 72 hours before the declaration by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Bean, 35, was ordered evicted from her Milwaukee apartment. She’d lived there for three years despite the sagging ceilings, smell of urine in the hallways and homeless squatters in the basement – because it was all she could afford.

September’s reprieve by the CDC, which protected many, but not all, renters will expire in January.

At that point, an estimated $32 billion in back rent will come due, with up to 8 million tenants facing eviction filings.

Reuters

Unemployment aid is running out for millions: “People are going to become desperate”

Millions of unemployed Americans faced an income “cliff” in July when the extra $600 in pandemic jobless benefits came to an end. But millions more are now facing another — and perhaps more dire — hit to their income as they exhaust all their unemployment options at both the state and federal levels. 

“People are saying, ‘Oh my god, I’m running out of money,’ and they have no idea what’s to come,” said Alex Emanuel, an actor, filmmaker and musician in New York whose unemployment aid ran dry two months ago. 

The issue is affecting a range of workers, including people who lost their jobs toward the end of 2019 and have run through multiple unemployment aid extensions provided by Congress earlier this year. Gig-economy workers and others who tapped the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program early in the crisis are also about to run out of aid.

CBS News

How Wealth Reduces Compassion

As riches grow, empathy for others seems to decline.

Who is more likely to lie, cheat, and steal—the poor person or the rich one? It’s temping to think that the wealthier you are, the more likely you are to act fairly. After all, if you already have enough for yourself, it’s easier to think about what others may need. But research suggests the opposite is true: as people climb the social ladder, their compassionate feelings towards other people decline.

Berkeley psychologists Paul Piff and Dacher Keltner ran several studies looking at whether social class (as measured by wealth, occupational prestige, and education) influences how much we care about the feelings of others. In one study, Piff and his colleagues discreetly observed the behavior of drivers at a busy four-way intersection. They found that luxury car drivers were more likely to cut off other motorists instead of waiting for their turn at the intersection. This was true for both men and women upper-class drivers, regardless of the time of day or the amount of traffic at the intersection. In a different study they found that luxury car drivers were also more likely to speed past a pedestrian trying to use a crosswalk, even after making eye contact with the pedestrian.

Scientific American

When Cops are Revolting

Over the summer, Embrace, a domestic violence organization in northwestern Wisconsin, decided to hang Black Lives Matter signs at its four locations.

It was a small but meaningful sign of allyship amid a national reckoning on police violence and systemic racism. Embrace serves survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault in four rural, predominantly white counties ― Rusk, Washburn, Barron and Price ― and Katie Bement, the executive director, wanted to ensure people of color felt comfortable visiting it.

“We were approaching it from an accessibility standpoint,” she told HuffPost over Zoom on Thursday. “We needed to show that we’re safe for those communities of color.”

In September, Bement said, she began receiving emails from local law enforcement who were disturbed by the signs, interpreting them as anti-police.

Barron County voted to strip the organization of $25,000 in funding for 2021. The county’s director of health and human services resigned from Embrace’s board of directors. Since then, a majority of the 17 law enforcement agencies that work with Embrace have indicated that they will no longer partner with the domestic violence organization, including all law enforcement in Washburn County.

HuffPo

Amy Coney Barrett accused of ‘unconscionable cruelty’ in teen rape case

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has been accused of “unconscionable cruelty” by a watchdog group over her role in an appellate court decision overturning a district court which found a Wisconsin county liable for millions in damages to a woman who alleged she had been repeatedly raped by a jail guard.

“After a 19-year old pregnant prison inmate was repeatedly raped by a prison guard, Amy Coney Barrett ruled that the county responsible for the prison could not be held liable because the sexual assaults fell outside of the guard’s official duties. Her judgment demonstrates a level of unconscionable cruelty that has no place on the high court,” Kyle Herrig, president of the progressive watchdog group Accountable.US, told Salon.

Raw Story

Third Justice Dept. Prosecutor Publicly Denounces Barr

A 36-year veteran of the Justice Department this week accused Attorney General William P. Barr of abusing his power to sway the election for President Trump and said he was quitting, making him the third sitting prosecutor to issue a rare public rebuke of the attorney general.

“Barr’s resentment toward rule-of-law prosecutors became increasingly difficult to ignore, as did his slavish obedience to Donald Trump’s will,” Phillip Halpern, a federal prosecutor in San Diego, said in a letter published Wednesday in The San Diego Union-Tribune. “This career bureaucrat seems determined to turn our democracy into an autocracy.”

NY Times